Read about My Game: The Chains of Acadia

I have been developing software professionally for about 5 years now, and I have been playing video games nearly my entire life. The combination of the two is something that I decided to tackle back in July of this year. Having never programmed for anything other than enterprise software, I decided to ease my way into the scene via XNA. I was already familiar with C# through my work, so it was an obvious choice to learn the basics and dip my toes into the ocean of game design.

Since I am a full-time employee, I usually only get nights and weekends to work on this project. I would love to dedicate all my time to the development of my first game, but I am constantly reminded that something has to pay the bills. Anyway, you did not come here to read about my life; you came to read about my game! I have quickly learned that game development calls for many different talents. Some of the requirements include skills that I simply do not possess. Namely, I have trouble producing quality art, sound, and music. Since I am in this alone (for now), I have to rely on the wonderful open source community to fill this important gap. I can handle the technical side no problem, but when it comes to art, yikes. Without further ado, here is my game.

The Chains of Acadia is a story of a hero. Oh, wow, how original. The thing is though, Acadia (the hero), does not know that he is a hero. When he finds out the truth, he probably will not want the status bestowed upon him. I do not want to ruin the story, so I will stop there and simply explain the style of play involved. The best way to describe the style is to picture Smash TV mixed with a slight bit of Touhou and some minor RPG elements.

Take this image from my Twitter account for example. You can see that the player is constricted on four sides by the walls of the screen. Not every screen will have this type of layout, but it will be the most common. The player has to complete several waves and challenges to proceed to the next screen. Remember in Zelda dungeons when going through a door would slide the camera to the next screen? This is similar.

Screens (maps) will make up a larger “level” that the player can explore to complete challenges, events, and puzzles. Unlike Smash TV, I want the player to have to return to certain screens for one reason or another. Maybe to pick up an item that was not available the first time around. Maybe there is a locked door that can only be opened by pushing a button or retrieving a key in another map. In order to add some fun to the mix, I have implemented a system that generates bullet patterns reminiscent of the Touhou series of games. This allows me to create some really cool challenges that the player must navigate through while attempting to destroy waves of enemies, defeat boss battles, or complete puzzles.

The player has three bars to manage. First, the health bar indicates the player’s life. When it is empty, you die. That should not be a surprise. Second, the blue bar indicates the player’s shields. Enemies will drop power ups and upgrades that will protect the player or increase the power of a player’s weapon. Shields will allow the player to absorb hits without damaging his health. This is useful when bullet hell gets a little too hell-like. Finally, the orange bar is the player’s weapon experience. This is kind of like Cave Story where picking up weapon power balls will increase the strength of your weapon.

I am planning to add a weapon inventory that the player can cycle through when the going gets tough and the default machine gun just does not cut it. Of course, you will have to find the weapons first. Currently the game includes a machine gun, a rocket launcher, a mine layer, a grenade launcher, a flamethrower, and a spread shot gun. I am eventually going to add upgrades to these weapons attainable through the weapon experience bar or item shops. One step at a time.

You can follow the development of my game on Twitter and IndieDB. I hope you follow along!

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